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'Concerning amounts of lead' found in veggie puffs for kids, Consumer Reports says

High levels of lead in children's food have been linked to things like developmental delays and behavioral issues.
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Posted at 1:05 PM, Jun 06, 2024

Consumer Reports is alerting parents about what's in popular veggie puffs that are marketed as children's snacks.

The advocacy group says it tested products from Lesser Evil and Serenity Kids and found "concerning amounts of lead."

The highest levels were reportedly found in Lesser Evil’s Lil’ Puffs Intergalactic Voyager Veggie Blend puffs. Consumer Reports says the puffs had "more lead per serving than any of the 80 baby foods" it has tested since 2017.

Other products with high levels of lead, according to Consumer Reports, include Lesser Evil’s Lil’ Puffs Sweet Potato Apple Asteroid and Serenity Kids’ Tomato & Herb, Bone Broth puffs.

High levels of lead in children's food have been linked to things like developmental delays and behavioral issues.

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The Food and Drug Administration says it is working with stakeholders to reduce lead in foods, proposing new limits that are expected to be finalized in December.

"We have prioritized foods commonly eaten by babies and young children because their smaller body sizes and metabolism make them more vulnerable to the harmful effects of these contaminants," the agency states on its website.

However, Consumer Reports notes that there are currently no limits for lead in snack foods.

As for what's causing the high concentration of lead in these snacks, the advocacy group points the finger at the cassava root, which is used in the tested products. Angelia Seyfferth, who works in the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences at the University of Delaware, told Consumer Reports that lead occurs naturally in soil and accumulates at the roots of plants.

If parents want to continue giving their kids these snacks, Consumer Reports says to do so sparingly and pay attention to serving sizes.